Paradise lost book 9. Paradise Lost: Book IX 2022-10-27

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Book 9 of John Milton's "Paradise Lost" is a pivotal point in the epic poem, as it marks the fall of man and the beginning of the story's tragic narrative. In this book, we see Satan's successful temptation of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, and their subsequent expulsion from the paradise they had been given.

One of the key themes of this book is the concept of free will. Milton presents the idea that God has given humans the freedom to choose their actions and decide their own destiny. Satan, on the other hand, represents the forces of evil that seek to corrupt and deceive humans, tempting them to make the wrong choices. In this book, we see Satan using all of his cunning and manipulation to convince Adam and Eve to eat the forbidden fruit, knowing that it will result in their fall from grace.

Another important theme in this book is the idea of temptation and its consequences. Milton uses the story of Adam and Eve's temptation and fall to explore the dangers of giving in to temptation and the costs of disobedience. The temptation of the fruit represents the allure of knowledge and power, and Adam and Eve's decision to eat it represents a desire to be like God. However, their disobedience ultimately leads to their expulsion from the Garden and the beginning of their suffering in the world.

Book 9 also explores the concept of femininity and gender roles. Eve, in particular, is depicted as being more susceptible to temptation than Adam, and her role as the first woman is closely tied to her role as the first sinner. This depiction of Eve has been a source of controversy and has been interpreted in a variety of ways, with some seeing it as a reflection of Milton's own views on gender and others seeing it as a commentary on the broader cultural attitudes of the time.

In conclusion, Book 9 of "Paradise Lost" is a crucial turning point in the epic poem, as it marks the fall of man and the beginning of the tragic narrative. It explores themes of free will, temptation and its consequences, and femininity and gender roles, and it remains a classic and influential work of literature to this day.

Paradise Lost Book 9 Summary & Analysis

paradise lost book 9

If care of our descent perplex us most, Which must be born to certain woe, devourd By Death at last, and miserable it is To be to others cause of misery, Our own begotten, and of our Loines to bring Into this cursed World a woful Race, That after wretched Life must be at last Food for so foule a Monster, in thy power It lies, yet ere Conception to prevent The Race unblest, to being yet unbegot. Not God omnipotent, for Fate; yet so Perhaps thou shalt not Die, perhaps the fact Is not so heinous now, foretasted fruit Profaned first by the serpent, by him first Made common, and unhallowed, ere our taste; Nor yet on him found deadly ; yet he lives; Lives, as thou saidst, and gains to live, as Man Higher degree of life; inducement strong To us, as likely tasting to attain Proportional ascent; which cannot be But to be Gods, or Angels Demi-Gods. In the final book a vision of Salvation through the Son is revealed to Adam by Michael. What can your knowledge hurt him, or this Tree Impart against his will if all be his? Thus, they share the same punishment, as they shared the same guilt. Milton hopes she will visit him in his sleep and inspire him, as he worries he began this task too late in life and cannot finish it alone.

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Paradise Lost Book IX, Lines 404

paradise lost book 9

However, he has forbidden himself from even considering the possibility of repentance. He had to wind his way up the trunk of the tree, because the fruit was so high that Eve or Adam would have to stretch to reach it. He could consent to a brief separation, but he fears their foe. I miss thee here, Not pleas'd, thus entertaind with solitude, Where obvious dutie erewhile appear'd unsaught: Or come I less conspicuous, or what change Absents thee, or what chance detains? O why did God, Creator wise, that peopl'd highest Heav'n With Spirits Masculine, create at last This noveltie on Earth, this fair defect Of Nature, and not fill the World at once With Men as Angels without Feminine, Or find some other way to generate Mankind? He said he ate his fill, and found it wonderful. Wouldst thou approve thy constancie, approve First thy obedience; th' other who can know, Not seeing thee attempted, who attest? Adam says he gains strength in her presence. Because the Garden's growth seems to surpass their labors, Eve suggests that on this day they work apart.


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Book IX

paradise lost book 9

Milton believes that one cannot first obey reason and then obey God; rather one must trust God and then trust reason. Adam is a noble character. He immediately realizes what Eve has done. Analysis Paradise Lost itself should be considered a work of tragedy along the same lines as the epic tragedies that preceded it. Because thou hast heark'nd to the voice of thy Wife, And eaten of the Tree concerning which I charg'd thee, saying: Thou shalt not eate thereof, Curs'd is the ground for thy sake, thou in sorrow Shalt eate thereof all the days of thy Life; Thornes also and Thistles it shall bring thee forth Unbid, and thou shalt eate th' Herb of th' Field, In the sweat of thy Face shalt thou eate Bread, Till thou return unto the ground, for thou Out of the ground wast taken, know thy Birth, For dust thou art, and shalt to dust returne. Satan's temptation of Eve is a cunning masterpiece.

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Paradise Lost Book 9 Flashcards

paradise lost book 9

She has opportunity to use right reason, but she doesnt take it. In her solitude she is deceived by Satan. And the next item on a killer's bloody agenda may well be Brady's own beloved daughter. O voice once heard Delightfully, Encrease and Multiply, Now death to heare! Why shouldst not thou like sense within thee feel When I am present, and thy trial choose With me, best witness of thy Vertue tri'd. Hope elevates, and joy Bright'ns his Crest; as when a wandering fire Compact of unctuous vapour, which the night Condenses, and the cold environs round Kindled through agitation to a flame Which oft, they say, some evil Spirit attends Hovering and blazing with delusive light Misleads the amazed night-wanderer from his way To bogs and mires, and oft through pond or pool ; There swallow'd up and lost, from succour farr. Not terrible, though terrour be in Love And beautie, not approached by stronger hate, Hate stronger, under show of love well feign'd, The way which to her ruin now I tend. If he, a serpent, achieved speech and intelligence from eating the fruit, then surely Eve will become a goddess if she eats it.

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Satan: Character in Paradise Lost Book 9

paradise lost book 9

Not only is she herself corruptible, however, but she also seeks to corrupt others: her immediate reaction upon discovering her sin is to lure Adam into her fate. Easie to mee it is to tell thee all What thou commandest; and right thou shouldst be obeyd: I was at first as other Beasts that graze The trodden herb, of abject thoughts and low As was my food; nor aught but food discern'd Or Sex, and apprehended nothing high: Till, on a day roving the field, I chanced A goodly tree far distant to behold Loaden with fruit of fairest colours mixed Ruddy and gold: I nearer drew to gaze; When from the boughs a savoury odour blow'n, Grateful to appetite, more pleased my sense Than smell of sweetest fennel, or the teats Of ewe or goat dropping with milk at even Unsucked of lamb or kid, that tend their play To satisfy the sharp desire I had Of tasting those fair Apples, I resolv'd Not to deferr; hunger and thirst at once, Powerful persuaders, quick'nd at the scent Of that alluring fruit, urg'd me so keene. After their fall, the Son of God tells Adam and Eve about God's judgment. But if thou judge it hard and difficult, Conversing, looking, loving, to abstain From Loves due Rites, Nuptial embraces sweet, And with desire to languish without hope, Before the present object languishing With like desire, which would be miserie And torment less then none of what we dread, Then both our selves and Seed at once to free From what we fear for both, let us make short, Let us seek Death, or hee not found, supply With our own hands his Office on our selves; Why stand we longer shivering under feares, That shew no end but Death, and have the power, Of many wayes to die the shortest choosing, Destruction with destruction to destroy. Eve, thy contempt of life and pleasure seems To argue in thee somthing more sublime And excellent then what thy minde contemnes; But self-destruction therefore saught, refutes That excellence thought in thee, and implies, Not thy contempt, but anguish and regret For loss of life and pleasure overlov'd. Between Thee and the Woman I will put Enmitie, and between thine and her Seed; Her Seed shall bruise thy head, thou bruise his heel. Eve speaks to Adam lines 856—85 , urging him to eat the fruit, which she says does not, after all, bring death but rather godlike wisdom.

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Paradise Lost, Book 9

paradise lost book 9

Now was the Sun in Western cadence low From Noon, and gentle Aires due at thir hour To fan the Earth now wak'd, and usher in The Eevning coole when he from wrauth more coole Came the mild Judge and Intercessor both To sentence Man: the voice of God they heard Now walking in the Garden, by soft windes Brought to thir Ears, while day declin'd, they heard And from his presence hid themselves among The thickest Trees, both Man and Wife, till God Approaching, thus to Adam call'd aloud. Milton has given absolute power to the reason and free will of both men and Satan, only to show that the mind can defeat itself—using reason to arrive at an unreasonable position. But least the difficultie of passing back Stay his returne perhaps over this Gulfe Impassable, impervious, let us try Adventrous work, yet to thy power and mine Not unagreeable, to found a path Over this Maine from Hell to that new World Where Satan now prevailes, a Monument Of merit high to all th' infernal Host, Easing thir passage hence, for intercourse, Or transmigration, as thir lot shall lead. The next morning, Adam and Eve prepare for their usual morning labors. Goe whither Fate and inclination strong Leads thee, I shall not lag behinde, nor erre The way, thou leading, such a sent I draw Of carnage, prey innumerable, and taste The savour of Death from all things there that live: Nor shall I to the work thou enterprisest Be wanting, but afford thee equal aid. On the eighth day Satan returns to Eden disguised as a mist, following the Tigris River and rising up in the fountain next to the Tree of Life.

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Paradise Lost Book 9 Summary

paradise lost book 9

So rose the Danite strong Herculean Samson, from the harlot-lap Of Philistean Dalilah, and waked Shorn of his strength. In spite of all his power and unyielding defiance to God, he is intellectually condemned by Milton, and in the end he himself realizes his impotence and inner helplessness. Adam needs even less persuading than Eve to eat the apple, and does so knowing that he is disobeying God. For him, the ultimate hero is not measured in physical strength but in moral power. Eve will soon be lost in his labyrinthine argument and plot. Milton voices doubts about whether his society will appreciate a real Christian hero, or whether he himself is still skilled enough or young enough to complete his literary task, balancing his confidence in his own ability with the humility appropriate to a Christian poet. The couple choose each other over God in a perversion of the hierarchy of love, in which love of God should come first.

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Paradise Lost: Book IX

paradise lost book 9

Milton displays the internal agony that results from the sin of despair: Satan can clearly see, despite all his previous arguments, that it would have been better to remain good. This said, they both betook them several wayes, Both to destroy, or unimmortal make All kinds, and for destruction to mature Sooner or later; which th' Almightie seeing, From his transcendent Seat the Saints among, To those bright Orders utterd thus his voice. There they their fill of love and love's disport Took largely, of their mutual guilt the Seale, The solace of their sin, till dewy sleep Oppress'd them, wearied with their amorous play. Down he descended strait; the speed of Gods Time counts not, though with swiftest minutes wing'd. Since it is impossible for him to take his revenge upon God directly, he decides to avenge him by hurting his favorite creature, Man.

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