The bluest eye annotations. Analysis of Toni Morrisonā€™s The Bluest Eye 2022-10-28

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The Bluest Eye, written by Toni Morrison in 1970, is a novel that explores themes of race, beauty, and self-worth through the experiences of its young protagonist, Pecola Breedlove. Set in Lorain, Ohio in the 1940s, the novel follows Pecola as she struggles to find acceptance and love in a society that values white beauty above all else.

Throughout the novel, Morrison uses various literary techniques to convey the themes and messages of the story. One such technique is the use of annotations, or small notes or explanations added to the text. These annotations serve a number of purposes, including providing background information, offering insight into the characters' thoughts and motivations, and highlighting important themes and symbols.

One significant example of annotation in The Bluest Eye is the use of song lyrics and other cultural references. Morrison frequently includes snippets of popular songs and cultural references in the text, often using them to comment on the experiences of the characters. For example, Pecola's mother Pauline often sings the song "Blue Skies" as she works, and the lyrics of the song serve as a commentary on the bleak and hopeless reality of Pecola's life. Similarly, references to films and other cultural phenomena, such as Shirley Temple and "The Little Colonel," serve to highlight the societal obsession with white beauty and the damaging effects it has on Pecola and other black characters in the novel.

Another important use of annotation in The Bluest Eye is the inclusion of footnotes and other explanatory notes throughout the text. These notes often provide background information about the historical and cultural context of the novel, helping readers to better understand the experiences and perspectives of the characters. For instance, Morrison includes a number of footnotes explaining the history of Lorain, Ohio and its significance as a center of industry and immigration. These notes also help to illustrate the ways in which the larger societal and cultural forces shape the lives and experiences of the characters.

In addition to providing background information and cultural context, the annotations in The Bluest Eye also serve to highlight the themes and symbols of the novel. For example, Morrison frequently uses the image of blue eyes as a symbol of the societal obsession with white beauty and the damaging effects it has on Pecola and other black characters. The annotations help to reinforce this symbol by providing additional context and explanation, making it clear to readers the importance of this image in the overall narrative.

Overall, the annotations in The Bluest Eye play a crucial role in helping readers to better understand the characters, themes, and symbols of the novel. Through the use of song lyrics, footnotes, and other explanatory notes, Morrison provides valuable context and insight into the experiences of Pecola and the larger societal forces at work in her life. These annotations serve to enrich the reading experience and enhance the depth and complexity of the novel.

The Bluest Eye: Sparklet Chapter Summaries

the bluest eye annotations

Claudia and Frieda do not allow Rosemary to expose herself, understanding that the act would be demeaning to her, but even more demeaning for them. Pecola lacks the rootedness that, by contrast, allows Claudia to survive the difficulties of growing up as a little black girl. Claudia remembers a curious kind of "defensive shame" succeeded their astonishment. Retrieved November 15, 2007ā€” via Access World News. The truth about what happened to Pecola is shocking to Claudia, but what is more disturbing to her is the response of the town.

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The Bluest Eye: STUDY NOTES / BOOK REVIEW by Toni Morrison

the bluest eye annotations

The author of this essay uses the setting of the novel to explain how this was a time of discrimination, and identifies the problems with the people in Lorain, Ohio. The story Pauline Breedlove tells herself about her own ugliness reinforces her self-hatred, and the story she tells herself about her own martyrdom reinforces her cruelty toward her family. Cholly and newfound cousin, Jake, begin a youthful flirtation with two girls, Darlene and Suky. With The Bluest Eye, Morrison set out to create a distinctively black literature, what she calls a "race-specific yet race-free prose. The Bluest Eye begins with a replication of the Dick and Jane Readers that were one of the primary instruments used to teach generations of American children how to read. Indian Journal of American Studies.


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The Bluest Eye Study Guide

the bluest eye annotations

Although Claudia and Frieda have difficult situations to negotiate, none of them are as destructive as the circumstances Pecola faces. Pauline joined the church, started working for a wealthy white family, and neglected her own. Retrieved March 6, 2021. In The Bluest Eye, Morrison also uses lips to indicate a boundary or border. Retrieved November 28, 2016.

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Five Annotations for 'The Bluest Eye'

the bluest eye annotations

He tries to avoid touching her hand when taking her money. He was the only one to love her enough to "touch her, envelop her, give something of himself to her. Like Pecola, Junior is abused, but in a different way. Cholly dies in a workhouse, and Pecola and Mrs. Rosemary denies Claudia and Frieda access based on the color of their skin. The Breedloves are said to take their ugliness into their hands like a cape they then don. When Cholly loses interest in his marriage, his life, and his children, he turns to drink and idleness.

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The Bluest Eye Quotes by Toni Morrison

the bluest eye annotations

Henry out of the house. Blue also tells a peculiar tale about a dead white woman who was beheaded by her husband and who haunted her former home blindly in search of a comb. The MacTeer girls return home following Mr. The person who suffers most from white beauty standards is, of course, Pecola. Once they have been introduced, Mr.

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Bluest Eye Study Guide

the bluest eye annotations

Pecola asks Frieda if her menstruation means she can have a baby now. Frieda tells her that they are not allowed to come into her house, and Miss Marie laughs and throws a glass bottle at them. Dewey Prince is the only man that Miss Marie likes. MacTeer as women, whereas Claudia and Frieda are still girls. She feels that the bath removes all of her inventiveness and creativity, the essence of herself; however, Claudia discovers that conformity is a necessary element of maturity and, eventually, she learns to love her white dolls and Shirley Temple, and to take baths without complaint. Meanwhile, she continually receives confirmation of her own sense of uglinessā€”the grocer looks right through her when she buys candy, boys make fun of her, and a light-skinned girl, Maureen, who temporarily befriends her makes fun of her too.

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The Bluest Eye: Full Book Summary

the bluest eye annotations

Informed that Pecola is at her mother's workplace, a house in a white neighborhood, they go there. Claudia, however, hates Shirley Temple in the same way she hates the white baby dolls she receives for Christmas. That night in bed, Claudia and Frieda are full of awe and respect for Pecola. We honed our egos on her, padded our characters with her frailty, and yawned in the fantasy of our strength. Following the funeral and the incident in the woods, Cholly erroneously thinks he has impregnated Darlene and runs off to find a man he believes is his father, Sampson Fuller. Night and Day In The Bluest Eye Morrison distinguishes between night and day, darkness and light, and night becomes a time to be feared. They sacrifice the money they have been saving for a bicycle and plant marigold seeds.

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The Bluest Eye Themes

the bluest eye annotations

These ideas seemed to be arranged by the stating that Pecola Breedlove is a lost little black girl, who because of her idea that being white would solve all her family and life problems, looses her true self. Pecola may be a misspelling of Peola, the character from the film named Peola, played by actress Freddi Washington. This habitual redirection of his anger at relatively helpless individuals occurs most frequently with his family. Rosemary observes Claudia and Frieda trying to help Pecola and shouts out to Mrs. Each incident, while often unresolved, demonstrates to Claudia the norms of her community and the rules that govern the behavior of the adults in that community. What was America like in 1941? Banned in the U. Spring: Chapter 7 A fifteen, Pauline Breedlove married Cholly.

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Analysis of Toni Morrisonā€™s The Bluest Eye

the bluest eye annotations

The marigolds never bloom, and Pecola's child, who is born prematurely, dies. Initially, someone suggests Mr. The condition of their house contrasts the idealized home introduced in the opening Dick and Jane section, but regardless of its condition, the house is their own, which remains an important part of their identity and sense of worth as a family. Some of the rooms are lit with kerosene lamps, but others remain dark and occupied by roaches and mice. Her inarticulateness made us believe we were eloquent. Cholly merely responds to stimuli in his environment and is incapable of functioning as anything other than an abuser.

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